If You Liked Harry Potter Read . . . The Chronicles of Narnia

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My uncle gave me a boxed set of the Chronicles of Narnia when I was seven or eight years old, and I’ve loved it ever since. To this day, a small part of me still believes that I can find Narnia in the back of my closet, in a painting, at a train station . . . You never know, okay?

 

Here’s the strange thing: While everyone has heard of this series and considers it a classic, very few people I know have actually read it.

 

Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie are playing hide-and-go-seek when they discover Narnia in the back of a wardrobe. There, they have all sorts of adventures, become kings and queens, and grow old together. When they discover their way back home, they realize that time runs differently in Narnia. Although they were gone for a lifetime in Narnia, they were only away for a few minutes in the “real” world. In later books, they go on to have other adventures in Narnia.

There are different ways to read this series. Most people start with The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe—the most popular book and the first one featuring the Pevensie children.

 

There has been debate on the order in which the books should be read. I read them in chronological order because that was how they were labeled in my boxed set—with the Magician’s Nephew as the first book.

 

Although I think you need to read the whole thing to get the entire effect of the world, I think that the books featuring the Pevensie children are the most magical. If nothing else, read these three books: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; Prince Caspian; and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. (Yes, these are the three books that have been turned into movies. I definitely believe that they picked the right ones to film.)

 

The part of this series that really resonated with me when I read the series was Aslan told Peter and Susan that they were too old to return to Narnia (Prince Caspian). It’s symbolic—Narnia is a place for children to discover. Giving up Narnia means growing up and living in the real world.

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Have you read this series? What did you think? Let me know in the comments below..

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